Sunday, October 23, 2011

http://www.ed.gov/blog/2011/10/the-arts-and-humanities-in-a-well-rounded-education/

Art is not a statistic.

Art cannot be quantified;

Isn’t that the argument?

“Among teachers reporting a decrease in instruction time for arts

education, our study identified a more likely reduction in time spent on

arts education at schools identified as needing improvement and those

with higher percentages of minority students”

(GAO Report to Congressional Requester, February, 2009 p. 30).

Art does not define students;

It allows individuality

Interpretation

Exploration

Inquiry…

And so much more.

“One of the unintended consequences of NCLB was the shrinkage of time available to teach anything other than reading and math. Other subjects, including history, science, the arts, geography, even recess, were curtailed in many schools” (Ravitch, 2010, p. 107).

When did the possibilities of art end?

Isn’t art a part of what is read, and

What math can create?

“When the teacher’s perspective is one that might be called emergent rather than prescriptive, the stakes for pedagogical innovation are higher and the demands greater” (Eisner, 2002, p. 152).

What is a student’s future?

Why is education limiting what they can be?

Who they are

Their dreams

What they perceive as their success…

Whose lens of responsibility is broken?

“I believe that all students should have the opportunity to experience the arts in deep

and meaningful ways. The opportunity to learn about the arts and to perform as artists is an

essential part of a well-rounded curriculum and complete education” (Duncan, 2011, p. 2) 

The power of “should”

Education is broken

Incomplete

Inopportune

Children suffer

As “essential” never reaches reality

At the expense of….

Success?

 “Our contribution to reform may be a suggestion for catching more frequent glimpses of the half-moon, more frequent movements with flamenco dancers, more heart-stopping dialogue with those who find themselves on stage. It is immeasurable, but it may signify a necessary professional development; it may be named ‘possibility’” (Greene, 2001, p. 132).

Where are the educators?

What happened to the art of teaching?

The benefits of learning?



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